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Sullivan County Conservation District

 95 County Farm Rd. Unity, NH 03743

 603-542-9511 x269

Field Trips & School Programs

Connect your students to the natural world by learning outdoors.  This can take place on public lands, a green space near your school, or in your school yard! 

Discover County Lands

Bring learning to life for your students! With more than 2100 acres of undeveloped land that includes old farms, forest, fields, streams, and wetlands, Sullivan County provides opportunities for people to connect to the natural world and each other.

The Natural Resource Department has created two sites for education on the county lands so far, one at Marshall Pond that connects to Unity Mountain Trail and the other at the County Complex called the Eco Ag Center, which includes a community garden, native pollinator garden, research high tunnels, pond and stream, and forest classroom.​

Need transportation funding? We have some funds to support your field trip to County Lands.  Just fill out this simple form and we will get back to you soon.

Seasonal Programs

The following programs can be conducted as a series of field days in your schoolyard, nearby public lands, or as a field trip to County Lands. Our educators will work with you to tailor the program to meet your curricular goals, schedule and preferred location.  Optimum learning group size is 15 student participants. Larger learning group sizes are possible, but teachers must be willing to co-teach or lead a group in exploration.  All materials will be provided including a simple guide to facilitating each activity. There are no fees for these programs and partial to full transportation funding is available on a limited basis for the 2019-2020 school year.

Grades K-2
Grades 3-5
Grades 6-8
 
Grades 9-12
NH Envirothon
Homeschool

CONNECT & EXTEND LEARNING

Enhance your field trip to Sullivan County lands through pre/post lessons taught or co-taught at your school with the Education and Outreach Specialist.  We will work with you to tailor the experience to meet your goals. 

grades k-2

 

Amazing Pollinators | Fall, Late Spring

Pollinators are responsible for 1 out of every 4 bites of food that we eat! Students will explore the relationships of plants and insects in the garden as they complete a scavenger hunt.  They will observe pollinators at work and record what they notice by sketching and drawing. Other topics may include plant and/or insect life cycles, pollination, and honeybees.  

      Special Note: The SCCD Community Garden or a school garden is necessary for this lesson.

Bud Exploration | Fall, Winter, Spring

How do trees that lose their leaves survive the winter? Students will learn about the life cycle of a tree, observe buds up close and explore what protects them from winter weather.  This may include winter tree identification.

Earthworm Investigations| Fall, Spring

Ever wonder how earthworms survive underground? Can a worm that is cut in two grow into two new worms?  How do worms know which way is up or down? Students will use scientific skills and tools to investigate the answers to these questions.  They will also learn about the life of a worm through song.

     Special Note: This is primarily an INDOOR program.  Best paired with Underground World or                   Forest Floor Exploration

Face in the Moon| All Seasons

Using a projected starfield called Stellarium, students will observe the full moon.  They will discover what other cultures see in the face of the moon and hear the stories connected to them. Students will create their own story about what they see in the moon face. Other topics may include moons of other planets and moon phases.

    Special Note: This is an INDOOR program that requires a wall or screen for projection.

Forest Floor Exploration| Fall, Spring

What lives down there under the leaves and why don’t leaves continue to pile up every year? These questions will be answered as we explore the forest floor like scientists.  Many levels of the food web will be discovered, but our focus will be on decomposers and their important role in the forest. 

Journaling Skills| Fall, Spring

Students will learn how to use a journal to record information during nature study.  This includes drawing and writing and focuses on details instead of artistic ability. Activities will be chosen based on the time of year, study location, and grade level.

   Special Notes: Schools will need to provide journals for students. Pair with Observation Skills.

Meet the Neighbors | All Seasons

Discover life in the forest, field, stream, pond, or garden. Students will use scientific practices and tools to explore an ecosystem and learn about the plants and animals that live there.  Topics may include adaptations (structure & function), community roles, life cycles, or food web relationships.

Maple Sugaring | Spring

Sullivan County is the #1 maple syrup producer in NH.  Students will learn what makes New England a good place for Sugar Maples to grow as well as learn about the life cycle of a tree.  They will learn about the process of turning sap into sugar and get to taste test some different grades of syrup.

    Special Note: Our sugar house is only for collecting sap. Students will learn about the process, but        not experience it. 

Mission Monarch | Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect as you search for monarch butterfly eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides among the milkweeds. Count how many of each life stage you find.  This number will be recorded and reported to an International citizen science project. Information about the monarch breeding population helps organizations to make decisions that help to protect monarch habitat and their amazing migration.

Nature Art| All Seasons

Inspired by the artistry of Andy Goldsworthy, students will use natural materials to express themselves in art. This can be individual or group work. Students tour the Nature Art or NART gallery and practice giving positive feedback to others. 

Observation Skills | All Seasons

Create and practice routines and skills for learning in the outdoor classroom.  Students will learn how to observe the world around them with all their senses, practice using a magnifying lens to see from another perspective, and practice a common language for nature observation.   

   Special Note: This is a great precursor to any other lesson.​

Owl Adaptations | All Seasons

Learn how nocturnal animals are different from diurnal animals. Using owls as an example, students will test themselves to see how their senses compare to an owl’s senses. They will observe artifacts and explore topics such as sight, hearing, flight, identification and vocalizations. 

    Special Note: This can be an indoor or outdoor program.

Sense of Place | All Seasons

Students will explore a place using all their senses in focused activities.  This may include sit spots, nature art, music, journaling and play acting. These various activities will help students understand the importance of using the senses they typically do not rely on, as well as, hone the ones they do. 

Snow Science | Winter

Winter is a great time to get outside and explore, especially after a good snowfall. Students will dig a snow pit, measure depth and temperatures, and consider the impact of thermodynamics on wildlife movement.  Snowflake size and structure may also be a focus if conditions are right. 

     Special Note: There needs to be snow for this class. 

Surviving Winter | Winter

Discover how plants and animals survive long, cold, dark New England winters.  Topics may include migration, hibernation, food cacheing, tracking, and tree characteristics.

     Special Notes: Some activities require snow.​

The Underground World | All Seasons

Soil is more than just dirt! It's a habitat. Students will learn about this underground world by crawling through a soil tunnel, investigating what soil is made of, and sorting critters by their roles in the community. 

     Special Note: This is an INDOOR program. Best paired with Earthworm Investigations or Forest             Floor Exploration.

 

grades 3-5

Be a Scientist | All Seasons

Students will collect data for any number of seasonal citizen science projects.  The data will be used by professional scientists around the world.  Mission Monarch, Project Budburst, Lichen Monitoring, Water Quality Testing, Pollinator Garden Phenology, and iNaturalist are some of the projects available.

   Special note: iNaturalist requires a free app to be downloaded.

Bud Exploration | All Seasons

How do trees that lose their leaves survive the winter? Students will learn about the life cycle of a tree, observe buds up close and explore what protects them from winter weather.  This may include winter tree identification.

Earthworm Investigations| Fall, Spring

Ever wonder how earthworms survive underground? Can a worm that is cut in two grow into two new worms?  How do worms know which way is up or down? Students will use scientific skills and tools to investigate the answers to these questions.  They will also learn about the life of a worm through song.

     Special Note: This is primarily an INDOOR program.  Best paired with Underground World or                   Forest Floor Exploration

Journaling Skills| Fall, Spring

Students will learn how to use a journal to record information during nature study.  This includes drawing and writing and focuses on details instead of artistic ability. Activities will be chosen based on the time of year, study location, and grade level.

   Special Notes: Schools will need to provide journals for students. Pair with Observation Skills.

Life in the Forest| Fall, Spring

Who lives in the forest and how do they interact with one another? Discover the answers to these questions and more through focused observations, role-playing games, activities and discussion. Topics may include energy flow, matter cycling, interdependence, and predator/prey relationships.

Mammal Tracks & Signs| Winter

Explore how wildlife moves through the winter landscape.  Be a detective and use clues such as tracks and signs to uncover the story of the animals that are active this time of year in the forest and field. 

   Special Note: Up-close examination of skins and skulls may be included when available.

Maple Sugaring | Spring

Sullivan County is the #1 maple syrup producer in NH.  Students will learn what makes New England a good place for Sugar Maples to grow as well as learn about the life cycle of a tree.  They will learn about the process of turning sap into sugar and get to taste test some different grades of syrup.

    Special Note: Our sugar house is only for collecting sap. Students will learn about the process, but        not experience it. 

Meet the Neighbors | All Seasons

Discover life in the forest, field, stream, pond, or garden. Students will use scientific practices and tools to explore an ecosystem and learn about the plants and animals that live there.  Topics may include adaptations (structure & function), community roles, life cycles, or food web relationships.

Mission Monarch | Summer, early Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect as you search for monarch butterfly eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides among the milkweeds. Count how many of each life stage you find.  This number will be recorded and reported to an International citizen science project. Information about the monarch breeding population helps organizations to make decisions that help to protect monarch habitat and their amazing migration.

   Special Note: Only available late July, August, and early September.

Monarch Tagging | Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect and migration as you search for and attempt to catch adult monarch butterflies. Adults that are caught will be tagged with a small sticker on their outer wing in an effort to monitor the migratory population. The data will be reported to an International citizen science project called Monarch Watch and used to help make decisions about monarch conservation. 

   Special Note: Only available September and sometimes early October.

Nature Art| All Seasons

Inspired by the artistry of Andy Goldsworthy, students will use natural materials to express themselves in art. This can be individual or group work. Students tour the Nature Art or NART gallery and practice giving positive feedback to others. 

Observation Skills | All Seasons

Create and practice routines and skills for learning in the outdoor classroom.  Students will learn how to observe the world around them with all their senses, practice using a magnifying lens to see from another perspective, and practice a common language for nature observation.   

   Special Note: This is a great precursor to any other lesson.​

Owl Adaptations | All Seasons

Learn how nocturnal animals are different from diurnal animals. Using owls as an example, students will test themselves to see how their senses compare to an owl’s senses. They will observe artifacts and explore topics such as sight, hearing, flight, identification and vocalizations. 

    Special Note: This can be an indoor or outdoor program.

Sense of Place | All Seasons

Students will explore a place using all their senses in focused activities.  This may include sit spots, nature art, music, journaling and play acting. These various activities will help students understand the importance of using the senses they typically do not rely on, as well as, hone the ones they do. 

Snow Science | Winter

Winter is a great time to get outside and explore, especially after a good snowfall. Students will dig a snow pit, measure depth and temperatures, and consider the impact of thermodynamics on wildlife movement.  Snowflake size and structure may also be a focus if conditions are right. 

     Special Note: There needs to be snow for this class. 

Soil Science | Fall, Spring

What is soil and why is it important? Use your senses and some tools to study the soil like a scientist. Tests include color, texture, composition, and water retention. The Soil Tunnel is a great addition to this program.

     Special Note: It is best if we can dig in the soil, but soil can be brought in if need be.

Stories in the Stars | All Seasons

Study the stars, the moon, planets, and the Milky Way Galaxy as you connect to cultures around the globe and across history.  Learn how to find the most obvious constellation in the sky at the time while learning science and cultural stories connected to it. 

     Special Note: This is an indoor program during the school day, but can be outdoors as a special             program at your school.  This could even be part of a Star Party in collaboration with the NH               Astronomical Society. 

Stream/Pond Studies | Fall, Spring

Discover life in an aquatic habitat by collecting and observing organisms that live on the bottoms and sides of the pond or stream. Learn how some of these special creatures act as biotic indicators, giving us information about the health of their habitat. Topics may include life cycles, food webs, adaptations, or water quality. 

     Special Note: Water quality test kits can be included upon request. 

Surviving Winter | Winter

Discover how plants and animals survive long, cold, dark New England winters.  Topics may include migration, hibernation, food cacheing, tracking, and tree characteristics.

     Special Notes: Some activities require snow.​ This is best as a series of 3 lessons.

The Underground World | All Seasons

Soil is more than just dirt! It's a habitat. Students will learn about this underground world by crawling through a soil tunnel, investigating what soil is made of, and sorting critters by their roles in the community. 

     Special Note: This is an INDOOR program. Best paired with Earthworm Investigations or Forest             Floor Exploration.

 

grades 6-8

All Day Hike| All Seasons

The Marshall Pond and Eco Ag Center education sites are connected via the 4-mile Unity Mountain Trail. The trail passes through forest and fields that were once farmland, allows access to 2 ponds, an overlook, and nearby beaver lodge and dam. Natural & cultural history can be taught along the trail and teachable moments abound. 

   Special note: Students will need to bring water and lunch and wear closed toed shoes.  This is not a loop trail. Drop-off and pick-up are at 2 different locations. Snowshoes are required for winter hikes.

Be a Scientist | All Seasons

Students will collect data for any number of seasonal citizen science projects.  The data will be used by professional scientists around the world.  Mission Monarch, Project Budburst, Lichen Monitoring, Water Quality Testing, Pollinator Garden Phenology, and iNaturalist are some of the projects available.

   Special note: iNaturalist requires a free app to be downloaded.

Journaling Skills| Fall, Spring

Students will learn how to use a journal to record information during nature study.  This includes drawing and writing and focuses on details instead of artistic ability. Activities will be chosen based on the time of year, study location, and grade level.

   Special Notes: Schools will need to provide journals for students. Pair with Observation Skills.

Life in the Forest| Fall, Spring

Who lives in the forest and how do they interact with one another? Discover the answers to these questions and more through focused observations, role-playing games, activities and discussion. Topics may include energy flow, matter cycling, interdependence, and predator/prey relationships.

Mammal Tracks & Signs| Winter

Explore how wildlife moves through the winter landscape.  Be a detective and use clues such as tracks and signs to uncover the story of the animals that are active this time of year in the forest and field. 

   Special Note: Up-close examination of skins and skulls may be included when available.

Mission Monarch | Summer, early Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect as you search for monarch butterfly eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides among the milkweeds. Count how many of each life stage you find.  This number will be recorded and reported to an International citizen science project. Information about the monarch breeding population helps organizations to make decisions that help to protect monarch habitat and their amazing migration.

   Special Note: Only available late July, August, and early September.

Monarch Tagging | Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect and migration as you search for and attempt to catch adult monarch butterflies. Adults that are caught will be tagged with a small sticker on their outer wing in an effort to monitor the migratory population. The data will be reported to an International citizen science project called Monarch Watch and used to help make decisions about monarch conservation. 

   Special Note: Only available September and sometimes early October.

Nature Art| All Seasons

Inspired by the artistry of Andy Goldsworthy, students will use natural materials to express themselves in art. This can be individual or group work. Students tour the Nature Art or NART gallery and practice giving positive feedback to others. 

Observation Skills | All Seasons

Create and practice routines and skills for learning in the outdoor classroom.  Students will learn how to observe the world around them with all their senses, practice using a magnifying lens to see from another perspective, and practice a common language for nature observation.   

   Special Note: This is a great precursor to any other lesson.​

Snow Science | Winter

Winter is a great time to get outside and explore, especially after a good snowfall. Students will dig a snow pit, measure depth and temperatures, and consider the impact of thermodynamics on wildlife movement.  Snowflake size and structure may also be a focus if conditions are right. 

     Special Note: There needs to be snow for this class. 

Soil Science | Fall, Spring

What is soil and why is it important? Use your senses and some tools to study the soil like a scientist. Tests include color, texture, composition, and water retention. The Soil Tunnel is a great addition to this program.

     Special Note: It is best if we can dig in the soil, but soil can be brought in if need be.

Stories in the Stars | All Seasons

Study the stars, the moon, planets, and the Milky Way Galaxy as you connect to cultures around the globe and across history.  Learn how to find the most obvious constellation in the sky at the time while learning science and cultural stories connected to it. 

     Special Note: This is an indoor program during the school day, but can be outdoors as a special             program at your school.  This could even be part of a Star Party in collaboration with the NH               Astronomical Society. 

Stream/Pond Studies | Fall, Spring

Discover life in an aquatic habitat by collecting and observing organisms that live on the bottoms and sides of the pond or stream. Learn how some of these special creatures act as biotic indicators, giving us information about the health of their habitat. Topics may include life cycles, food webs, adaptations, or water quality. 

     Special Note: Water quality test kits can be included upon request. 

Surviving Winter | Winter

Discover how plants and animals survive long, cold, dark New England winters.  Topics may include migration, hibernation, food cacheing, tracking, and tree characteristics.

     Special Notes: Some activities require snow.​

Valley Quest | Any Season

Tell the story of a special place by creating a Valley Quest on public lands. Vital Communities hosts this program and SCCD works with their educators to help students gain a sense of place through various activities. Students can focus on natural and/or cultural history.  They will create a map, design and carve an ink stamp, and create clues that are usually written in verse. 

   Special Notes: It takes many weeks to create a valley quest, so this is best as a series of lessons, once a week and requires a meeting or phone call with Vital Communities and SCCD to create a schedule and focus area. 

Winter Tree ID | Winter, early Spring

Be a twig detective.  Take a close-up look at twigs and buds.  Learn the lingo for the different structures and use field guides and keys to identify trees using everything but leaves.

 

grades 9-12

All Day Hike| All Seasons

The Marshall Pond and Eco Ag Center education sites are connected via the 4-mile Unity Mountain Trail. The trail passes through forest and fields that were once farmland, allows access to 2 ponds, an overlook, and nearby beaver lodge and dam. Natural & cultural history can be taught along the trail and teachable moments abound. 

   Special note: Students will need to bring water and lunch and wear closed toed shoes.  This is not a loop trail. Drop-off and pick-up are at 2 different locations. Snowshoes are required for winter hikes.

Biodiversity Blitz | Fall, Spring

Compare the biodiversity of 2 or more study areas.  Students will use field guides and keys to identify as many living organisms as possible in a specified area of forest, field, or wetland. They will use the Simpson's Biodiversity Index to compare species richness and evenness in each plot to determine which has more biodiversity.

Citizen Scientists | All Seasons

Students will collect data for any number of seasonal citizen science projects.  The data will be used by professional scientists around the world.  Mission Monarch, Project Budburst, Lichen Monitoring, Water Quality Testing, Pollinator Garden Phenology, and iNaturalist are some of the projects available.

   Special note: iNaturalist requires a free app to be downloaded.

Invasive Plants | Fall, Spring

How do exotic, invasive plants effect the ecology of an area?  Learn to identify some of NH's most wanted invasive plants and actively help manage some of these plants on the County Lands or schoolyard as a service learning project.

   Special note: Handsaws, pruning shears, and shovels will be provided. Gloves are not provided. 

Mammal Tracks & Signs| Winter

Explore how wildlife moves through the winter landscape.  Be a detective and use clues such as tracks and signs to uncover the story of the animals that are active this time of year in the forest and field. 

   Special Note: Up-close examination of skins and skulls may be included when available.

Mission Monarch | Summer, early Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect as you search for monarch butterfly eggs, caterpillars and chrysalides among the milkweeds. Count how many of each life stage you find.  This number will be recorded and reported to an International citizen science project. Information about the monarch breeding population helps organizations to make decisions that help to protect monarch habitat and their amazing migration.

   Special Note: Only available late July, August, and early September.

Monarch Tagging | Fall

Learn about the life cycle of an insect and migration as you search for and attempt to catch adult monarch butterflies. Adults that are caught will be tagged with a small sticker on their outer wing in an effort to monitor the migratory population. The data will be reported to an International citizen science project called Monarch Watch and used to help make decisions about monarch conservation. 

   Special Note: Only available September and sometimes early October.

Soil Science | Fall, Spring

What is soil and why is it important? Use your senses and some tools to study the soil like a scientist. Tests include color, texture, composition, and water retention. Students will learn about soil horizons and the underlying geology of NH soils. 

     Special Note: It is best if we can dig a soil pit, but soil can be brought in if need be.

Stories in the Stars | All Seasons

Study the stars, the moon, planets, and the Milky Way Galaxy as you connect to cultures around the globe and across history.  Learn how to find the most obvious constellation in the sky at the time while learning science and cultural stories connected to it. Discover threats to darkness and how you can measure light pollution through the Globe at Night project.

     Special Note: This is an indoor program during the school day, but can be outdoors as a special             program at your school.  This could even be part of a Star Party in collaboration with the NH               Astronomical Society. 

Stream/Pond Studies | Fall, Spring

Determine the health of an aquatic ecosystem through chemical and physical testing.  Students will also conduct a biotic survey - collecting and identifying benthic macroinvertebrates as a long-term measure of health.

Surviving Winter | Winter

Discover how plants and animals survive long, cold, dark New England winters.  Topics may include migration, hibernation, food cacheing, tracking, and tree characteristics.

     Special Notes: Some activities require snow.​

Valley Quest | Any Season

Tell the story of a special place by creating a Valley Quest on public lands. Vital Communities hosts this program and SCCD works with their educators to help students gain a sense of place through various activities. Students can focus on natural and/or cultural history.  They will create a map, design and carve an ink stamp, and create clues that are usually written in verse. 

   Special Notes: It takes many weeks to create a valley quest, so this is best as a series of lessons, once a week and requires a meeting or phone call with Vital Communities and SCCD to create a schedule and focus area. 

Winter Tree ID | Winter, early Spring

Be a twig detective.  Take a close-up look at twigs and buds.  Learn the lingo for the different structures and use field guides and keys to identify trees using everything but leaves.

 

NH Envirothon | 6-12

NH Envirothon is a hands-on environmental problem-solving competition for middle and high school-aged students in New Hampshire.

Since 1991, NH Envirothon has inspired teens to make responsible environmental and natural resource decisions through real-world, hands-on educational experiences. Many students step away from the Envirothon experience excited about learning and motivated to pursue careers in environmental studies, environmental law, natural sciences, and natural resource management. Students are tested on their knowledge in five topic areas: aquatics, forestry, soils and land use, wildlife and current environmental issues; and develop an understanding of effective teamwork, resource management and ecology. The state's winning team advances to the North American Envirothon competition.

Envirothon Training | All Seasons

The following lessons were created to train middle and high school students for the NH Envirothon. Most of them are field studies that are meant to supplement training that is already happening in the classroom or afterschool programs. They can be mixed and matched (as long as the season allows), but are most effective as once a month field experiences throughout the school year. Students learn about wildlife, soil, water, forest ecology and conservation from professionals in the field. The Education and Outreach Specialist will work with you to create a schedule and coordinate educators to teach each topic. If you are interested in other Envirothon topics, let us know and we’ll do our best to meet your needs. 

Forestry | All Seasons

Forestry has a language and tools of its own.  Learn the lingo and how to use a Biltmore stick to measure tree log height, diameter, and volume.  Students will be introduced to the four silvicultural systems and will practice determining the age and or stage of a stand of trees.

Mammal Tracks & Signs| Winter

Explore how wildlife moves through the winter landscape.  Be a detective and use clues such as tracks and signs to uncover the story of the animals that are active this time of year in the forest and field. 

Presentation Skills | All Seasons

Each team will make a presentation on the Current Issue.  Learn tips and tricks to be good presenters.  Practice your presentation for SCCD staff and get feedback.  

  Special Note: This is an INDOOR program.

Soil Mapping | All Seasons

Learn how to read soil maps on an online database to determine which ones should be conserved for agriculture, forestry and other uses.  Students may observe different soil types in the field. 

     Special Note: This is an primarily an INDOOR program.

Soil Science | Fall, Spring

What is soil and why is it important? Use your senses and some tools to study the soil like a scientist. Tests include color, texture, composition, and water retention. Students will learn about soil horizons and the underlying geology of NH soils. 

     Special Note: It is best if we can dig a soil pit, but soil can be brought in if need be.

Trees of NH| All Seasons

Students will learn to identify trees of NH using guides and keys and practice inside and outside of the classroom.  Other topics may include trees as resources and invasive species (insects).

   Special Note: This is best taught while leaves are on the trees.  Laminated leaves will be used during winter.

Water Quality Testing | Fall, Spring

Determine the health of an aquatic ecosystem through chemical and physical testing.  Students will also conduct a biotic survey - collecting and identifying benthic macroinvertebrates as a long-term measure of health.

   Special Note: This can be broken into 2 sessions - Chemical Testing and Biotic Survey

Wildlife of NH| All Seasons

Students will learn to identify wildlife of NH through hands-on learning inside and outside of the classroom. Focus is placed on understanding habitat, human impacts, and relationships between wildlife and their environment.  

   Special Note: Up-close examination of skins and skulls may be included when available.

Sample Schedule

The 2nd Tuesday Morning of each month for 1 -2 hour block.

      October                 Soil Science

      November             Water Quality: Chemical Testing

      December              Forestry

      January                 Wildlife of NH

      February                Mammal Tracks & Signs

      March                   Soil Mapping

      April                     Tree Identification

      May                      Water Quality: Biotic Survey

 

Homeschool

Are you part of a home school group?  Each year we offer at least one 4-6 week series on county lands.  Past series have focused on Wilderness Navigation and Nature Investigations. Please register with Common Vision CSAA for series.  All of the school programs and field trips are available to be taught to home school students.  There needs to be a minimum of 6 students, mixed ages are encouraged.  Students 7 and under need adult supervision. Contact us if you would like us to lead a program for your home school cooperative. 

Winter Survival Series| Winter 2020

Discover how plants and animals survive long, cold, dark New England winters.  Topics may include migration, hibernation, food cacheing, tracking, and tree identification. 

   When: Thursday mornings in from 10am - Noon starting January 9, and ending January 30, 2020. This is a 4 week series. 

   Who: Ages 8+; younger must be with an adult. You must register with Billie Lambdin of Common Vision CSAA to attend.

   Special Note: Make sure to wear layers and be prepared for being outside for the whole time. If there is deep snow and you have snowshoes and know how to use them, bring them along. 

Nature Art Series| Spring 2020

This 5 week series will allow you to express yourself and share your experiences in nature with others through different forms of art.  We will use our senses to experience the natural world and tap into our creativity as we learn to use a nature journal, construct 3-D art with natural materials, and playact.

   When: TBD

   Who: Ages 8+; younger must be with an adult. You must register with Billie Lambdin of Common Vision CSAA to attend.

   Special Note: Make sure to wear layers and be prepared for being outside the whole time. 

Ethnobotany Series| Fall 2020

Ever wonder how native peoples and the first settlers knew which plants were edible and which were inedible? People and plants have a long history with one another.  Plants have been used as food, medicines, and many other things.  Learn about some useful plants that live in NH and even create a soothing salve. This is a 4-5 week series.

   When: TBD

   Who: Ages 8+. You must register with Billie Lambdin of Common Vision CSAA to attend.

   Special Note: Make sure to wear layers and be prepared for being outside the whole time.