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Find past newsletter articles, press releases, and other media showcasing local agriculture, placed-based education, and conservation of natural resources in Sullivan County.

Learning Outdoors Builds Confidence and Community

The following article was printed in the Eagle Times on April 27, 2018 and in the eTicker News of Claremont, Section A, page 26 on April 30, 2018. There is more to learn outdoors than science, literature, and social studies. Students and teachers from Charlestown Middle School use their outdoor classrooms as places to build community and empower students. This was evident when 2nd graders from Keene took a field trip to Charlestown Middle School and joined the 7th graders for their bi-monthly Clay Brook field day. The 2nd graders were partnered with 7th graders who were to look out for their safety and learn with them at each rotation. This was a great opportunity for them to mentor other

Hollow Trees & Life Lessons

This past month, 2nd graders from Keene took a field trip to Charlestown Middle School and joined the 7th graders for their regular Clay Brook field day. The 2nd graders were partnered with 7th graders who were to look out for their safety and learn with them at each rotation. This gave them an opportunity to mentor others, practice kindness, be responsible, and teach others about their special place. Some of the 7th graders took on another leadership role, teaching the 2nd graders and their peers. Kathleen and Abby led a kinesthetic activity focused on how sap movement in trees is based on the air and ground temperatures. The 2nd graders were tuned into details, so they helped the 7th grade

Aquatic Insects

These little creatures usually go unnoticed in streams and ponds because they live in the mud and on the edges of the aquatic world, not to mention, they are very small and camouflaged. As the water temperatures start to rise again in spring, their little ectothermic (cold-blooded) bodies start to warm-up too. There are many different types of aquatic macro-invertebrates and some of them act as biotic indicators for water quality. Biotic indicators are living things that have special habitat requirements or are very sensitive to pollution or changes in their environments. Their presence in an ecosystem tells us something about the habitat's overall health. Take stoneflies for example, they

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Sullivan County Conservation District

 95 County Farm Rd. Unity, NH 03743

 603-542-9511 x269